CAI

Course

An introduction to the various types of table service styles and settings, including American, French, Russian, banquet, and family style. Emphasis is placed in proper dining room preparations, customer relations, placing and retrieving orders, clearing of tables, and securing the dining room. Students will also be exposed to the role of the dining room in the overall business plan of the restaurant business. The course also covers an introduction of wines and wine making.

This course introduces students to the principles of conduct and employment in the food service industry, coupled with sanitation concepts in the operation of a food service establishment. Professionalism, ethics, conduct, and employment opportunities during and after completion of a degree are discussed. Personal hygiene, fire safety regulations, including state and federal laws pertaining to the handling of food products are studied. This course prepares students for a nationally recognized ServSafe certification exam provided by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF)

This course is intended to provide a strong foundation in the basic fundamentals of commercial food preparation and practices. Proper knife skills and the use and care of tools and equipment is demonstrated and practiced in the laboratory. Emphasis is placed with students using hands-on experience in food production utilizing designed introductory menus. The hands-on experience is supported with demonstrations and lecture in the laboratory. Students will learn the appropriate cooking methods that may be applied to meats, fish, poultry, starches, and vegetables. The basic cooking methods are introduced and practiced in the laboratory. Students will also learn the proper techniques used in the preparation of stocks, soups, and sauces.

An introduction to the basic and advanced level of breakfast cookery, including basic egg preparations, breakfast meats, potatoes, quick breads, batters, various breakfast items, farinaceous and hot and cold cereals. Students will experience short order cooking, and will gain knowledge of time and temperature in the preparation of various breakfast items. Skills and techniques will be developed in the preparation of meat products, such as sausage-making, and in the preparation of other breakfast meats. Ethnic and multicultural breakfast foods will be explored, as well as creative and modern breakfast alternatives. This course also serves as an introduction to the preparation of various salads, including simple, composed, bound, and hot/cold combinations. Emphasis will be on the preparation of dressings, dips, spreads, classical and modern sandwich-making, identification and use of salad greens, and fruit preparations.

Bakeshop I2 Credits

An introduction to the preparation of basic quick breads, rolls, breakfast items, and basic desserts, including various icings and butter cream, puddings, cakes, cookies, and pies. Students will gain skills in the preparation of pie crusts, pie washes, and pie fillings. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding and use of ingredients, weights and measures, tools, and equipment used in the bakeshop.

This course brings together the four most important foundations in foodservice purchasing: market and distribution systems, storeroom operations, cost controls, and product identification. In addition, this course covers current issues like security, legal and regulatory compliance, sustainable agriculture, aquaculture and genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

An extension and reinforcement of the skills practiced in Table Service I. Emphasis is placed on knowledge of the menu, suggestive selling techniques, napkin folding, and the use of wines and spirits in the restaurant business. Banquet service will be performed through a designed and scheduled buffet.

This is a course designed to provide the student with on-the-job food service experience. The course allows the student to gain supervised practical experience working in a variety of food-service settings related to the student?s area of interest. Students must successfully complete 150 hours of practical experience in an approved food-service establishment.

A continuation and reinforcement of the concepts and practices of Production Kitchen Skills I. This course exposes the students to more advanced techniques and applications utilizing different cooking methods. Students will be exposed to a variety of seafood items, as well as commercial meat cuts used for beef, lamb, veal, pork and poultry.

This course exposes students to the preparation of brunch items, fish and shellfish, hot and cold hors d oeuvres, cold canapes, cold plated entrees, and specialty sandwiches as well as the design of salad bar setups. Basic forcemeat preparations used for pates, galantines, terrines, and spreads are practiced in the laboratory. This course also includes the preparations of basic cheese-making, relishes, condiments and chutneys, including jams and jellies. Students will also prepare various entree salads.

Bakeshop II2 Credits

This course is an extension and reinforcement of the concepts and practices of Bakeshop I. Students will be exposed to a variety of designed menus to strengthen their skills in the preparation of baked goods. They will also learn how to utilize leftover baked goods to prepare various products. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of various cake batters and icings.

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of menu development as well as the procedure for designing and building a foodservice operation. Strong emphasis is given to the consequential interrelationship between the two and is substantiated through cogent explanation and demonstration. Students develop basic menus for a variety of meal periods based on a learned systemization. The course examines the tried and true process for designing, building and commissioning a restaurant including space allocation, work and product flow, facilities engineering, equipment selection and energy practices.

The student will gain knowledge of the overall operation of a restaurant, including the training of various techniques and styles of service. Emphasis will be placed on the study of wines from various regions, and the art of pairing wine with food. Hands-on beverage service and mixology are practiced in the laboratory. French culinary terminology will be integrated.

This is a course designed to provide the student with on-the-job food service experience. The course allows the student to gain supervised practical experience working in a variety of food service settings related to the student?s area of interest. Students must successfully complete 150 hours of practical experience in an approved food service establishment.

Students will become familiar with the characteristics of various national cuisines, as well as the global interaction of cooking techniques, equipment and ingredients affecting the modern professional kitchen. Students will prepare a variety of international soups, sauces, vegetables, starches and entrees from various regions around the world, as well as gaining an understanding of dietary guidelines and dining habits of numerous regions of the world.

An introduction to the preparation of vegetable and fruit carvings, ice sculpturing, aspics, chaud-froid, and timbales through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on experience. Emphasis will be placed on the proper techniques of garde manger preparations, terminology, departmental structure and design, and the use of various equipment and tools. Students are also introduced to the preparation of marinades, mousses, pickling, canning, pates, forcemeats, galantines, sausages and charcuterie. The techniques, terminology, planning and design of buffets are also learned and practiced.

Students are introduced to advanced pastries, classical desserts, and cake decorations. They will learn various mixing methods, the preparation of mousses, and advanced piping techniques with an overall emphasis on plate presentation.

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the methods, tools, and procedures used to control food, beverage, and labor costs in a food service organization. Emphasis is placed on each step in the flow of costs: purchasing, receiving, storage, issuing, preparation, portioning, service and accounting for sales. Labor costs as they relate to the operation are discussed. Active problem-solving and practical applications are used in class. Basic computer applications of cost-control systems will be introduced. Applied problems in the hospitality industry will also be included.

This course examines the techniques, methodologies and procedures involved in the successful operation of a restaurant. Students will develop skills in the tableside preparation and service of appetizers, entrees, salads, and desserts. This course will include the perspective on meeting customer expectations, and the importance of the interaction with guests. The student will gain practical knowledge of structuring a banquet, and the ability to design and coordinate a buffet. French culinary terminology will be emphasized.

This is a course designed to provide the student with on-the-job food service experience. The course allows the student to gain supervised practical experience working in a variety of food service settings related to the student?s area of interest. Students must successfully complete 300 hours of practical experience in an approved food-service establishment.

Students will gain an understanding of the historical importance and effect of classical French cuisine on cooking in the 21st century. Emphasis will be placed on the preparation of classical soups, sauces, vegetables, starches, and entrees. In addition, students will examine contemporary interpretations of traditional dishes and how variations can be introduced and executed in kitchens across each segment of the foodservice industry.

This course is structured to provide the student with theoretical and practical experiences in advanced garde manger. Students will also be introduced to salt sculpturing, cold sauces and dressings, curing and smoking of foods, sushi and sashimi preparations, international appetizers and hors d?oeuvres, and cheese identification and presentation. Emphasis will be placed on the planning, preparation, design, and set-up of cold food preparations for a buffet. They will also be introduced to tallow and shortening sculpturing, platter garnishes, and decorative show platters. Lectures will include off-premise catering, food show rules and regulations, food presentation and platter arrangement.

Students will be introduced to classical showpiece mediums, such as nougat, pastillage, chocolate work and advanced cake preparations. The course will focus on the various techniques needed to produce these mediums, along with learning how to prepare a classical dessert buffet.

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