HUS

Course

This introductory course offers an overview of the human services profession. It emphasizes human needs and social problems; provides an historical perspective of the development of the profession; and introduces students to professional values, ethical behavior, theories, knowledge and methods necessary for helping others.

Students deepen their understanding of professional values, strategies of intervention, and behavior necessary for helping others. Students learn problem-solving skills and participate in activities to increase self-understanding.

This course reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of the effects of addictions on the abuser and the family. Biopsychosocial information is reviewed. Students develop competency in areas of ethical and legal conduct necessary to begin entry-level work in the addictions field. Competency is also developed in the area of multiculturalism as it impacts counselors at all service levels. This course emphasizes knowledge of the effects of the different drugs (i.e., Opioids, Stimulants, Depressants, Analgesics, THC). Students are able to define co-dependency and the roles commonly assumed by families affected by Substance Use Disorder.

This course promotes competence in addictions counseling by focusing on the following topics: individual, group, and family counseling; treatment of the addicted person; familial aspects of counseling; techniques of crisis intervention; and ways to provide education. Students already employed in fields related to Addictions Counseling can enroll in these courses to become a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC) working under the supervision of a Licensed Clinical Alcohol and Drug Counselors (LCADC). This course helps to fulfill the Counseling educational domain for the certification.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of addictions counseling and emphasizes the role of collaboration in seeking and using community resources. Students learn about resources available in New Jersey to assist clients. The course looks at the criminal justice system and its levels of involvement in addictions treatment. This course introduces students to the basic skills required for professional readiness including documentation and identifying levels of care. This class identifies and introduces underlying principles and competencies of modern addiction counseling, its complexity and application. This course helps to fulfill the educational requirements of the Certification Board of NJ to become a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC). Following completion of the educational requirements for the CADC students need to complete 3000 hours of supervised fieldwork experience to receive the certification.

This course introduces standards for ensuring thorough documentation in addictions counseling. Students learn about the counselor's need for cultural competence, personal growth, and professional growth. The course explores counselor/client expectations based on goals, objectives, rules, and obligations. This course reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of addictions counseling professionals' conduct related to ethical, legal, personal, and professional development, and the practice and benefit of clinical supervision. The importance of community involvement including professional networking is emphasized through lecture. This course helps to fulfill the educational requirements of the Certification Board of NJ to become a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC). Following completion of the educational requirements for the CADC students need to complete 3000 hours of supervised fieldwork experience to receive the certification.

This course addresses initial interviewing, assessment, intake and early phase counseling processes utilized at addiction treatment centers. Students address the role of screening and assessment in the initial intake process. Students develop skills in the area of initial assessment. Students analyze the current DSM categories and criteria of Substance Use Disorder and their implementation. Students learn about different forms of addiction including gambling. Students discuss the physical impacts addiction can have. This course helps to fulfill the educational requirements of the Certification Board of NJ to become a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC). Following completion of the educational requirements for the CADC students need to complete 3000 hours of supervised fieldwork experience to receive the certification.

This course exposes students to various groups that are encountered when working in the Human Services field. Students observe and analyze key aspects of group dynamics such as power and control within a variety of small-group settings: counseling, discussion, support groups. Students explore and practice key interpersonal skills such as conflict resolution, decision-making and goal-setting under instructor-guided simulations. Leadership skills are developed along with personal behavioral style. Various theoretical perspectives are discussed throughout the course.

Students learn how human service professionals produce change in the communities in which they live, work and participate in order to improve the quality of life and relationships among the members of those communities.

Examines the methods of data collection employed within a variety of social service agencies. Emphasis is placed on the helping interview, its elements and characteristics. In addition, concepts of communication, interaction, the self, and interviewing skills will be examined and practiced.

The externship in Criminal Justice is designed to develop professional standards and practical skills. This elective course will provide students with the opportunity to integrate theoretical principles learned in the classroom with firsthand experience in actual Criminal Justice agency settings. Students will perform tasks and engage in meaningful learning activities in order to acquire knowledge of the workings of a significant component of the criminal justice system. Students will develop interpersonal skills, values and the attitudes associated with professional growth. Under the direction of a faculty member and the supervision of an agency Field Supervisor, students will perform agency tasks nine (9) hours per week for 15 consecutive weeks for a total of 135 hours [add]. In addition, students will attend weekly seminars at the College during the externship to discuss and share their experiences and observations with faculty and peers.

Students are placed in a second social service agency that extends and deepens HUS 231. The the expectation in this course is the integration of knowledge and theory gained from the classroom throughout the human services sequence as it is applied in the field experience. The requirements are fulfilled on the basis of working 9 hours per week for 15 consecutive weeks for a total of 135 hours. In addition, students attend a weekly seminar to discuss their experiences. Students may remain in the same agency two terms with permission from the faculty member.

Students are placed in an agency that focuses on addictions issues in order to apply their coursework in the field. This course integrates knowledge and theory gained from the classroom throughout the human services and addictions sequence as it is applied to the field experience. Students use evidence based practices. The requirements are fulfilled on the basis of working 135 hours of work at a site placement and attending a weekly seminar class to discuss their experiences. Pre-requisite- HUS 231

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